December 13, 2019

December 13, 2019 – The U.S. FDA has approved an expanded indication for Tiglutik® (riluzole) oral suspension, manufactured by ITF Pharma. Under the expansion, the product can now be administered via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

ALS is a disease of the motor neurons that affects approximately 16,000 individuals in the United States. As motor neurons deteriorate and die off, the brain loses its ability to send signals to the body’s muscles. This causes progressive loss of voluntary movement, which often leads to difficulty swallowing and may necessitate the placement of a PEG tube to deliver nutrients, fluids, and medications directly to the stomach.

In a clinical study, Tiglutik oral suspension was found to be bioequivalent when administered via PEG tube compared to the previously approved oral route of administration. Recommended dosing is 50mg taken twice daily at least one hour before or two hours after a meal, with 12 hours between doses. The patient’s serum aminotransferases should be monitored before and during treatment.

Tiglutik’s active ingredient, riluzole, has been FDA approved to treat ALS since 1995.

Actual drug patent expiration dates and availability of new medications are subject to change due to patent litigation, settlement agreements, additional patents, exclusivities, and final FDA approval. Distribution and availability of new medications at pharmacies may not occur immediately following FDA approval. Patients are advised to speak with their healthcare professional or pharmacist regarding appropriateness as well as actual availability.

*This is provided for information only. The reference to any medication above does not mean the medication is covered by your plan.

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